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UFOs at Eagle Ford Shale ??

For those that haven’t heard the buzz about UFO sightings in the Eagle Ford Shale drilling area, it has created quite a stir among residents and alien enthusiasts alike. Personally, I find the thought of a UFO to be fun, of course that could change pretty quickly if I come face-to-face with one. From what I have heard, these sightings are difficult to tell how close or real they really are.

The thought of a UFO sighting may sound terrifying to some, but I welcome any sort of extraterrestrial visitors to Eagle Ford Shale or any other drilling spot. In fact, if their ship (or whatever sort of craft they fly through the universe on) breaks down, I will gladly sell them a few generators to power back up. Of course, I doubt they deal in dollars or any other type of earthly currency, but I guess we will just have to cross that bridge when we get to it.

The most recent UFO sighting in the southern region of Texas explains a lot — with all the new residents traveling to the area for drilling work, it is only fitting that an aircraft full of aliens wants to join the party. They must have felt left out.

The Power of Being Alien

On several occasions during starry October nights, drillers in the Eagle Ford Shale region spotted UFO lights in the sky above. Then, to elevate their story, a surveillance camera also spotted an object resembling a flying saucer with several distinct and blaring lights.

Sorry, but I just can’t help think a flying saucer like that must require an immense amount of power generation. I sure hope they have a backup power source, or perhaps a few diesel generators on-board. What am I saying? They probably have a more efficient energy source that never fails. What I would give to be an alien for a day.

With the recent influx in UFO sightings, all of the new residents of La Salle County must be wondering if the aliens are trying to get in on some of the oil drilling action in the area, especially since one of the sightings was directly over a drilling site.

Are The Sightings For Real?

For those wondering about the validity of the UFO sightings, many of the cell phone and surveillance pictures and videos have passed numerous authenticity tests proving they were not falsified in any way. Which leads to the conclusion that someone is either investing a lot of money on an extremely elaborate prank, or the sightings are a legitimate UFO.

One of the most interesting things about the numerous UFO sightings in the Eagle Ford Shale area is that not one person has reported them to the authorities. The La Salle County Sheriff’s Department has no reports on file of people calling about UFO sightings in the area.

Why Drilling Sites?

Once the initial shock of the UFO sightings wore off, many people in Eagle Ford Shale began to speculate about the symbolism behind the UFO sightings over drilling sites. While some people say the sight of a UFO could easily be compared to a simple flicker of city lights or a military aircraft flying overhead, others insist that UFOs are seen over drilling fields for a reason.

Like the other remote sightings, UFOs are often spotted in desert areas, many of which surface over oil wells. This leads some theorists to believe that the UFOs are looking to fuel up their spaceships with crude oil. I still think UFOs run on some power source we don’t even know about yet, but I’ll leave the speculation to everyone else. Another interesting correlation is that almost all UFO sightings are near bodies of water, which suggests aliens and/or their ships need water. Are we sounding like a conspiracy theorist website yet?

Whether you live around Eagle Ford Shale or are just interested in UFOs, keep your eye out for the buzz about UFOs in the area. And if you find one that breaks down, give us a call and we will hook them up with a few generators. For the record, Worldwide Power Products does not judge or discriminate against extraterrestrials.

Shale Energy and the Development of the Modern Economy

In a June 2009 Energy Information Administration study, nearly two-thirds of American oil was imported from overseas. Alaska contributed just 11 percent of domestic oil, with various oil fields in the continental U.S. supplying the rest. Just three years later in 2012, the U.S. is producing 38% of its own oil domestically, and taking measures to reduce dependence on gas and oil.

What’s the major difference between 2009 and 2012? Shale oil and gas. Okay, shale oil isn’t exactly new: In the 19th century, shale oil plants were built. However, crude oil is easier to extract, so as more crude oil deposits were found–and extracted–shale oil plants shut down. With the cost and scarcity of oil, America and other countries have gotten back into shale oil and gas. And America holds vast shale oil reserves–nearly as much as the world’s existing oil reserves, according to the Government Accountability Office.

Shale natural gas reserves have drastically cut the price of natural gas in America, making it incredibly cheap. These natural gas and oil reserves have the potential to transform America from a country weak in energy into an energy-rich nation. The explosion in natural gas led General Motors to develop two trucks that run on ng, improving fuel efficiency and cutting oil dependency. And long-haul trucks that fuel up with gas instead of oil save substantially at the pump. While LNG pumps might not be at every truck stop from California to Maine, they will be soon.

Proponents say America can step up oil exports, effectively turning the energy boom into cold cash that just may help the economy recover, create jobs, and foster innovation. Financial giant Citigroup estimated that shale oil could grow the U.S. GDP by 0.5 percent a year for the near future. This growth could make energy investment the type of expense that gives back substantially.

Not everyone is gung-ho on shale oil and gas, however. Critics claim the boom is slowing down–and with it, the potential for economic growth. A Credit Suisse report noted that we can expect those rapid-fire increases in shale production to slow. Sure, shale oil and gas production will still be substantial, but the boom-level growth of recent years might just be a flash in the pan. Meanwhile, states struggle to regulate shale oil and gas production, fuel taxes, and other issues; many areas also deal with protests from residents who don’t want fuel extraction in their backyard. This type of bureaucracy has the potential to slow the pace of innovation.

What’s your take on the promise of shale oil and gas? Has it peaked or is the real boom just beginning?

-Mark